Category: Business

Difference in Pro e-Sports vs. Traditional Sports: “Who’s in Charge”

Dan Primack of Axios attended “a party where you just felt you didn’t belong,” namely, the Overwatch League final match at Philadelphia’s Wells Fargo Center, “while filming an ‘Axios on HBO‘ segment about professional e-sports.”

Important insight: “The big difference between pro e-sports and traditional sports is who’s in charge. In e-sports, the publisher is king. The commissioner works for the CEO, not for the franchise owners.”

“It’s a model that makes sense for now, kind of like how console-makers once controlled game development. Well, until a group of Atari developers created Activision, in an act of decentralized rebellion that today’s Activision Blizzard would be wise to remember.”

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Nerd Street Gamers Raises $12M to Build eSports Facilities

Dean Takahashi of VentureBeat: “Nerd Street Gamers has raised $12 million in funding from Philadelphia discount retailer Five Below (and others) to build esports Localhost facilities that house leagues, training camps, tournaments, and showcases.”

“The deal is one more example of an investment boom for esports. Professional teams, as well as amateur esports players, can use these centers. Amateurs can rent the spaces when needed.”

Dan Primack of Axios explains the BFD: “E-sports has been growing ahead of its physical infrastructure, so back-build is needed to protect existing investments. Both on the professional and amateur side.”

Merch Alert: Walmart Now Selling

Dexerto.com: “Walmart is now hopping on board the esports merchandise train, stocking jerseys and accessories from some of the world’s most recognizable esports brands.”

“The Esports Fan Shop stocks items from the North American League of Legends Championship Series (LCS), the Overwatch League, the ESL Shop, and more. This means fans can pick up jerseys from Cloud 9, Ninjas in Pajamas, the San Francisco Shock, and over 40 more teams.”

100 Thieves Plans to Become Biggest Gaming, eSports Brand

100 Thieves is creating a new headquarters where there will be “esports practice space and a production soundstage that it plans to use for streaming matches, and distributing podcasts and other content (a retail storefront),” LA Business Journal reports.

“Esports company and team manager 100 Thieves raised $35 million in a Series B round to fuel its expansion and the development of a new headquarters in Los Angeles.”

“We now have everything we need to be the biggest gaming and esports brand in the world,” 100 Thieves Chief Executive Matthew Haag said in a statement.

 

Nike and K-Swiss Begin Making eSports Shoes

USA Today announces “Nike also has a sponsorship deal with TJ Sports – a joint venture between Chinese videogames firms Tencent and Riot Games – that will see the firm’s League of Legends Pro League team exclusively compete in Nike clothing until 2022.”

USA Today also claims “K-Swiss has launched a limited-edition sneaker designed specifically for esports players, with the brand claiming the $125 shoe is the first of its kind.”

K-Swiss promises their shoes will enhance gamers performance. Highsnobiety tell “The ONE-TAP’s heel is foldable, allowing its wearer to rock it like a slide. A ‘Flow Cool’ TPU venting unit creates breathability suited for rooms that are warm. Should the room prove cold, wearers can cover up the vents with a second wool in-sole, like a football player wearing sleeves when Lambeau Field becomes the Frozen Tundra.”

President of K-Swiss Barney Waters states, “In the esports world, this is no exception as physical and psychological preparation breeds excellence in performance, exactly what the ONE-TAP offers.”